Children’s Art Show At ACLL

 New exhibit at Alameda County Law Library Oakland

ACLL‘s new exhibit is a children’s art exhibit.  More information about the art program at the school at www.haywardchineseschool.org

Last Few Days – Exhibit @ ACLL Oakland – Voices & Visions From Inside San Quentin

Don’t miss it!!

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Voices and Visions from Inside San Quentin

Exhibit at the Alameda County Law Library

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Images offered by the inmate artists of the San Quentin Prison Arts Project.  Their art will be on display starting on January 9 through March 13, 2017 at ACLL Oakland.

  • Location –  125 12th Street, First Floor
  • Hours – Monday through Friday 8:30 to 4:30

Here is a statement about the San Quentin Prison Arts Project.

VOICES AND VISIONS FROM INSIDE SAN QUENTIN

January 9-March 13, 2017

The inmate artists of San Quentin Prison Arts Project are honored to be invited to exhibit their paintings, drawings and prints at the Alameda County Law Library. Access to arts in prison can transform lives by teaching self-discipline and hard work, and by helping incarcerated individuals find hidden talents. The dedicated teachers of Prison Arts Project mentor inmates, starting them on paths to further education and higher self-esteem with a true motivation to change their lives. Artists’ families are proud of the artwork and stories sent home. The process of growth and self-awareness helps enable inmates to stay out of prison and become valuable participants in our larger communities.

Exhibits like this are one way for inmates to give back to society. Several inmates chose to create work around ideas of law and justice, so there are portraits of our Supreme Court judges, and other leaders such as Angela Davis and Geronimo. Another artist created a poignant image of women waiting in the prison visiting room, hoping their family member is the next one through the door, and others used historical images for inspiration. In addition, many chose to share their dreams and visions of nature and life on the outside. We are especially proud to be able to include work from some formerly-incarcerated artists who are eager to continue to support our program from the outside!

Exhibits, books, and other creative projects create a bridge that helps break down stereotypes about inmates by sharing human feelings and experiences. Inmates who pursue the arts can develop their human potential to grow beyond the mistakes of their pasts. Bringing art opportunities and education to people in institutions has been shown to help lower recidivism rates and improve lives. We all benefit from reducing the costly cycle of incarceration. This is of great importance since over 90% of current inmates will return to our communities.

The Prison Arts Project, started in 1977, is the major program of the William James Association. It was the original model for Arts-in-Corrections, a statewide prison arts program which ran from 1980-2010 in all 34 California prisons, before it was reduced and then cut from the CDCR budget. The San Quentin Prison Arts Project continued uninterrupted with private funding support since 2003. Through the efforts of the William James Association, California Lawyers for the Arts, and many supportive legislators and individuals, California is currently reviving an Arts-in-Corrections Pilot Program through the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the California Arts Council. It is hoped that all California prisons will have one or two classes offered within 2017.

Effects of Arts-in-Corrections Programs: A new one-year study of inmates in four California correctional institutions revealed that arts programs improve prisoners’ behavior and their attitudes about themselves, thus encouraging them to pursue other academic and vocational opportunities. Further studies are now being supported through the CDCR and CAC.

This confirms research from the 1980’s, when a pair of studies found that participants in the California Department of Corrections Arts-in-Corrections Program had 75% fewer disciplinary actions and 27% lower recidivism rate than the general prison populations. This translates into reduced incarceration costs to the public as well as better lives.

To learn more about the program or these studies please visit: http://www.PrisonArtsProject.org

SAN QUENTIN PRISON ARTS PROJECT WOULD LIKE TO THANK: ca-arts-council-logo

  • Arts-in-Corrections, a partnership of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabiliation and the California Arts Council
  • Kalliopeia Foundation
  • Ronald Davis, Warden, San Quentin State Prison
  • Sam Robinson, Public Information Officer, SQ State Prison
  • Steven Emrick, Community Partnership Manager, SQ State Prison
  • Laurie Brooks, Executive Director, William James Association

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Prison Art Project – New Exhibit At ACLL Oakland

prisoner-art-project-image

Voices and Visions from Inside San Quentin

Exhibit at the Alameda County Law Library

studio-group2

Images offered by the inmate artists of the San Quentin Prison Arts Project.  Their art will be on display starting on January 9 through March 13, 2017 at ACLL Oakland.

  • Location –  125 12th Street, First Floor
  • Hours
    • MWF ~ 8:30 to 6:00
    • TTh ~ 8:30 to 9:00

Here is a statement about the San Quentin Prison Arts Project.

VOICES AND VISIONS FROM INSIDE SAN QUENTIN

January 9-March 13, 2017

The inmate artists of San Quentin Prison Arts Project are honored to be invited to exhibit their paintings, drawings and prints at the Alameda County Law Library. Access to arts in prison can transform lives by teaching self-discipline and hard work, and by helping incarcerated individuals find hidden talents. The dedicated teachers of Prison Arts Project mentor inmates, starting them on paths to further education and higher self-esteem with a true motivation to change their lives. Artists’ families are proud of the artwork and stories sent home. The process of growth and self-awareness helps enable inmates to stay out of prison and become valuable participants in our larger communities.

Exhibits like this are one way for inmates to give back to society. Several inmates chose to create work around ideas of law and justice, so there are portraits of our Supreme Court judges, and other leaders such as Angela Davis and Geronimo. Another artist created a poignant image of women waiting in the prison visiting room, hoping their family member is the next one through the door, and others used historical images for inspiration. In addition, many chose to share their dreams and visions of nature and life on the outside. We are especially proud to be able to include work from some formerly-incarcerated artists who are eager to continue to support our program from the outside!

Exhibits, books, and other creative projects create a bridge that helps break down stereotypes about inmates by sharing human feelings and experiences. Inmates who pursue the arts can develop their human potential to grow beyond the mistakes of their pasts. Bringing art opportunities and education to people in institutions has been shown to help lower recidivism rates and improve lives. We all benefit from reducing the costly cycle of incarceration. This is of great importance since over 90% of current inmates will return to our communities.

The Prison Arts Project, started in 1977, is the major program of the William James Association. It was the original model for Arts-in-Corrections, a statewide prison arts program which ran from 1980-2010 in all 34 California prisons, before it was reduced and then cut from the CDCR budget. The San Quentin Prison Arts Project continued uninterrupted with private funding support since 2003. Through the efforts of the William James Association, California Lawyers for the Arts, and many supportive legislators and individuals, California is currently reviving an Arts-in-Corrections Pilot Program through the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the California Arts Council. It is hoped that all California prisons will have one or two classes offered within 2017.

Effects of Arts-in-Corrections Programs: A new one-year study of inmates in four California correctional institutions revealed that arts programs improve prisoners’ behavior and their attitudes about themselves, thus encouraging them to pursue other academic and vocational opportunities. Further studies are now being supported through the CDCR and CAC.

This confirms research from the 1980’s, when a pair of studies found that participants in the California Department of Corrections Arts-in-Corrections Program had 75% fewer disciplinary actions and 27% lower recidivism rate than the general prison populations. This translates into reduced incarceration costs to the public as well as better lives.

To learn more about the program or these studies please visit: http://www.PrisonArtsProject.org

SAN QUENTIN PRISON ARTS PROJECT WOULD LIKE TO THANK: ca-arts-council-logo

  • Arts-in-Corrections, a partnership of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabiliation and the California Arts Council
  • Kalliopeia Foundation
  • Ronald Davis, Warden, San Quentin State Prison
  • Sam Robinson, Public Information Officer, SQ State Prison
  • Steven Emrick, Community Partnership Manager, SQ State Prison
  • Laurie Brooks, Executive Director, William James Association

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Mario Alfaro – Art Exhibit – ACLL Hayward

Mario Alfaro – Artist

Painter and muralist – Mario Alfaro – is displaying his paintings at the Hayward branch of the Alameda County Law Library.  The exhibit will run through March 24, 2017.  This show has been arranged in cooperation with the Hayward Arts Council

Artist’s bio –

Born in El Salvador, Alfaro revealed his artistic talent at an early age.  His childhood was one filled with sights and memories of war and natural disasters.  Born in a country at a time of unrest, he looked to art to fulfill his longing for a world full of color and expression.  His father was in the military and did not condone his artistic pursuits, but Alfaro would not be discouraged.  He left home for the capital, San Salvador, at the age of sixteen to study drawing and color at Centro Nacional De Artes Center at the Universidad Technologica.  Since then, Alfaro has taken part in art expositions, receiving honorable mentions, as well as, prizes for his painting.

Statement from the artist –

Art for me is an alternative to the hardness of life.  I paint to put color on nature and I believe that one must have a passionate consideration of art.  It is as important as ethics, as contemplation, or, as action.  Life is not a bundle of firewood to be carried, but rather it is a bundle of things and truths sprouting whenever a person wants to give it form.  Whenever I begin a painting, I feel that my impulses vary and I see many things in nature and real life… soon the painting surges like a dream which sometimes clarifies and sometimes disappears.  I always try to catch and return it to reality within my paintings.

For more information about the artist and his work contact – Yvette Tipton, 510-472-6596, info@expressfineart.com

ACLL Hayward is located at Room 162, 224 W. Winton Avenue,  Hayward, CA 94544.  Hours to view Alfaro’s work are Monday – Friday 8:30 to 5:00.

 

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Oakland Art Association – Exhibit Now At ACLL Oakland – Through October 28, 2016

Oakland Art Association – Exhibit at ACLL Oakland

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The Oakland Art Association is presenting a juried show of original works of art at Alameda County Law Library, 125 12th Street, Oakland.  The show will run until October 28th.

The OAA exhibit can be seen during normal library business hours:

  • Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays ~ 8:30 to 6:00
  • Tuesday and Thursdays ~ 8:30 to 9:00

The Oakland Art Association is a non-profit group of roughly 60 members, several of whom have been active over most of its almost 60 years.  OAA typically has about 10 juried shows each year, where members are invited to show original work which is competitively judges, and cash prizes are awarded.

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Miranda Show Prints Available For Purchase

Prints from the Alameda County Law Library exhibit –  Miranda: More than Words by Jason Oberbeck – are available for purchase.

Prints of Oberbeck’s original works, inspired by the United States Supreme Court case, Miranda v. Arizona, are now available for sale at $10.00 each.

The high quality reproductions are 18 x 12.5 inches in size.

Please ask about them at the Oakland Reference Desk.

The show continues to June 24.  Open during regular library hours.  MWF ~ 8:30 to 6:00, T/Th ~ 8:30 to 9:00.

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Miranda More than Words flyer rev 4-18-16 B